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Dreamers and doers
On campus

Chris Fay
Chris Fay

If anyone needs to know anything about the physical landscape of campus, they call Chris Fay. Fay, head of the Grounds department, is a champion for the trees. When four maples were in the way of construction for Jefferson Suites, he made sure they were transplanted onto other areas of campus. In 2009, 2010 and 2011 UNCG was recognized as a Tree Campus USA University. Fay says the Grounds staff takes such pride in the care of trees, “so that future generations will be able to enjoy the beauty of the trees as much as the current campus community does.”

 

This spring, members of the baseball team used their heads to help raise money to battle childhood cancer. Players shaved their heads in April and raised more than $3,000.

 

Angela Polk-Jones '89
Angela Polk-Jones '89

Angela Polk-Jones '89 holds the UNCG record for most points in women's basketball. Dr. Tom Martinek has been a UNCG professor of kinesiology for more than 30 years. Together, they helped launch the Middle College at UNCG. Martinek had been lobbying for this school for almost 10 years and finally saw it come to fruition last August with Polk-Jones at the helm as principal. Each year a new group of high school students will get started taking both high school and college classes and participating in internship experiences designed to expose them to a variety of health careers. “Here, we are going to encourage them, get them on the right track and help them find what interests them,” Polk-Jones says.

 

Ricole Wicks
Ricole Wicks

Media studies major Ricole Wicks has a dream to become the first-ever female, African-American, disabled sports broadcaster for ESPN. In the meantime, she's an advocate for disability issues and knows how to fight for what she needs.

 

 

 

Jeffrey Coleman, assistant director of multicultural affairs, was bothered by a statistic that showed of 72 black men enrolled at UNCG in 2003, only 19.4 percent graduated within four years and 45.8 percent graduated within six years. He set out to change it. With his Rites of Passage program, he is encouraging young black men to be successful and graduate.

 

Ashley Schnell '12 didn't want to have to choose between her love of music and love of running. So she didn't. She poured hours into her violin — practicing three to six hours a day and graduating with a 4.0 GPA. And in cross country and track she set school records in 11 events — one for each event in which she has competed.

 

If you've read anything about track & field this year, Paul Chelimo's name is bound to have come up. A native of Kenya, Chelimo is breaking school records. He, along with teammate and fellow Kenyan Paul Katam, qualified for the NCAA this year — and both are rising juniors. In fact, Chelimo came in second in the NCAA 5K. He went to Nationals in indoor, outdoor and cross-country and was first-team All-American each time. In addition to an exceptional year on the track, Chelimo is studying public health so he can eventually make a difference when he returns to his home country.

 

Rebecca Lloyd '50
Rebecca Lloyd '50

Students in the Lloyd International Honors College have a lot of reasons to thank Rebecca Lloyd '50. She gave $4 million to establish the college and to honor her parents. As a result of her gift, honors students take small, internationally focused courses taught by outstanding UNCG faculty members, study abroad for at least a semester and study a second language. The goal is to help students be ready to find their place in an increasingly interdependent world.

 

While we don't have a name for this person, the anonymous giver who donated $6 million to UNCG clearly made a difference. This gift has made it possible for more than 30 students to come to college debt-free or nearly debt-free each year as part of the UNCG Guarantee program.

 

 

 

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