UNCG Campus Weekly

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Taking on Steve Martin’s Surreal ‘Picasso’

041410EyeOnArts_LapinAgilePablo Picasso and Albert Einstein: two wild and crazy guys? Check out Steve Martin’s take on the artist and the scientist in UNCG Theatre’s production of Martin’s “Picasso at the Lapin Agile.”

“Picasso” runs Wednesday, April 14-Saturday, May 1, in UNCG’s Brown Building Theatre.

The premise is simple. It’s October of 1904. Picasso and Einstein, two young men who have not yet become famous but believe they will be –- Picasso in 1907 with Les Demoiselles d’Avignon and Einstein in 1905 with the publication of his special theory of relativity -– meet in a Parisian bar. They discuss philosophy, art, physics, logic and sex.

Director Kate Muchmore, an MFA directing student, describes “Picasso” as “a wonderful picture of what it is like to be on the cusp of something amazing.”

“Picasso and Einstein both challenged conventional thinking in their fields in order to discover new truths and ways of thinking about the world we live in,” she says. “They were both revolutionaries, and around their axes spun exciting changes in the way art is made and equally exciting theories about the universe, the speed of light, and relativity. What hopes and dreams did they have? What hopes and dreams did these turn-of-the-century people have for their new era? What hopes and dreams do we have 100 years later for our own era? This play inspires us all to reach for the best we have to offer the world, but to laugh at the absurdity of that world (and also ourselves) while we’re at it!”

“Picasso” plays at 7 p.m. April 14-17, April 28 and May 1 in the Brown Building Theatre on Tate Street.

Tickets are $15 for adults; $12 for non-UNCG students, senior citizens and children; $9 groups of 10 or more and UNCG Alumni Association members; and $7 for UNCG students. Contact the University Box Office at (336) 334-4849 or visit http://boxoffice.uncg.edu.

Photo by Bert VanderVeen
Thomas Mendolia as Picasso and Matt Palmer as Einstein