UNCG Campus Weekly

Campus Weekly is published each Wednesday when classes are in session. In the summer, it is published biweekly.

Lots to learn from (and with) your colleagues

UNCG’s Faculty Teaching & Learning Commons offers many workshops and events, in a wide variety of realms. Here is a sampling in the coming weeks:

Team-Based Learning Workshop: “Designing Group Work that REALLY Works” and “Getting Beyond Covering Content: A Key to Student Motivation and Success.” Friday, Nov. 22, 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m., Faculty Center. Lunch provided. Dr. Larry K. Michaelsen developed Team-Based Learning (TBL), a comprehensive small-group based instructional process that is now being used in more than 200 academic disciplines. Sponsored by the Division of Continual Learning. Email ftlc@uncg.edu for more information.

“What would the university look like if structured around student success?” Wednesday, Oct. 30, 11:30-12:30 p.m., 186 Stone. Skype discussion led by guest speaker Dr. William Plater, Provost Emeritus at IUPUI. Seating limited. Email ftlc@uncg.edu for more information and to register.

POWER UP Online Learning Hands-on Workshop. “Hybrid Training for Hybrid Instruction,” Monday, Dec. 16, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Pre-workshop materials — including sample web-based courses — available online starting Friday, Nov. 1. Participants will hear from UNCG students about online course experience and receive access to online courses, tips for design, best practices, available support, demonstrations of technologies and methods used by faculty, and hands-on “sandbox” sessions with UNCG’s experts. Working knowledge of Blackboard suggested. POWER UP.

Screencasting from your PC or Mac, Oct. 29, 12:30-1:30 p.m., McIver 140: (Matt Libera, ITC, School of Music, Theater and Dance) Video is taking over the web, and recording your computer screen (called “screencasting”) is an easy way to augment your instruction. Whether you want to demonstrate a computer task, record a PowerPoint lecture, or something else, there are free tools to help you get the job done. Attendees should bring laptops. Register here.

Quick and Free Visual Tools, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2-3 p.m. – ONLINE ONLY! (Beth Filar Williams, FTLC Fellow for Technology Tools, and Amy Harris Houk, FTLC Fellow for Information Literacy) Discover a few quick and easy-to-use visual tools such as pixlr for quick online image creation and editing and others. These tools can also help you develop a more universal design for learning in your classes.

How do I position myself to go to the next level? Mid-career Faculty Mentoring. Promotion and Tenure Panel in November. Date TBD. Discussions and organization led by James Benshoff, CED, FTLC Tenure Track Mentoring Fellow and Chris Poulos, Department Chair, CST.

Future Faculty Learning Community “Teaching Philosophy Workshop” by (Sarah Daynes, SOC, FTLC Fellow and Sheryl Lieb, ELC on Thursday, Oct. 24, 4-6 p.m. in the Faculty Center. Register here.

Community + Entrepreneurship Friday, Nov. 8, 8:30-10 a.m., TBD possibly Glenwood Coffee? (Chris Thomas, ART, FTLC Fellow and Steve Moore, Co-leader, Director, Undergraduate Studies)- UNCG has multiple efforts and initiatives going on across the city, but most prominently in Glenwood and the Downtown area. Find out who’s doing what across disciplines and more importantly, find out how to get your students involved. Registration.

Advising and Student Retention Wednesday, Nov.13, 3-4 p.m., —Faculty Center (Gail Pack, BUS, FTLC Fellow and Dana Saunders Co-leader, Director, Students First) This group works cross-departmentally to tease out best practices for faculty involvement with advising and retention. Campus Weekly article.

Deliberative Dialogue for Global Pedagogies, Thursday, Nov. 14, noon-1:30 p.m. (Brown bag), 401 Gatewood (Tommy Lambeth, IARC, FTLC Fellow for Global Engagement) Dr. Katy Harriger (Wake Forest University, Department of Politics and International Affairs.) Deliberative dialogue involves establishing ground rules for discussion that discourage dominance by a few, storytelling to promote empathy and understanding, and surfacing the values conflicts that underlie most policy debate.