UNCG Campus Weekly

Campus Weekly is published each Wednesday when classes are in session. In the summer, it is published biweekly.

UNCG students make an impact as Campus Greensboro Fellows

UNC Greensboro students are active participants in the Campus Greensboro Fellows Program. Now in its fourth year, the program served 107 college students this summer, and 42 of those students are from UNC Greensboro. Two UNCG students talk about their experience in the program and the impact they are making.

Spartans sponsor Music in the Park this Sunday

On Sunday, Aug. 18, come to Latham Park, bring some lawn chairs and maybe a snack, and enjoy music in the great outdoors.

Two bands will be featured at the free-admission event:

6 p.m. – Wonderwall, The Beatles Tribute (Beatles Cover Band)

7:15 p.m. – doby (Funk)

The concert will be held near W. Wendover at Latham Rd. and Cridland Rd.

The UNCG College of Visual and Performing Arts will promote the Collage concerts at this event, which is made possible by the sponsorship of UNC Greensboro.

 

 

New dean of HHS, Dr. Carl Mattacola, on Triad Today

Video: “Signs of Impact”

Graduates of UNCG’s unique Professions in Deafness program speak about their work as advocates and interpreters for the deaf and hard of hearing and the way they make connections with the North Carolina Deaf community.

In Memoriam: Lee Beverly

Dr. Lee Beverly, professor and former chair of the Department of Nutrition, died on March 24.

Beverly came to UNCG in 2012 as chair, a position he held until 2015. He was a distinguished scholar, receiving funding from NIH to support his research regarding hypothalamic mechanisms regulating energy balance and feeding behavior. He enjoyed all aspects of academia and mentored numerous students and faculty at UNCG – and The University of Illinois Urbana Champaign prior to coming to Greensboro.

There are no services planned but Beverly’s family and friends welcome others to join them in the Walk to Defeat ALS in Greensboro on May 11.

“Lee was also admired by his friends and colleagues as he managed his disease with incredible grace and courage never complaining throughout,” said current Department of Nutrition chair Ron Morrison. “A true friend that will be missed.”

 

 

George Singleton, notable alumnus, gives reading Thursday

The MFA Writing Program and The Greensboro Review will host a fiction reading by notable alumnus George Singleton on Thursday, March 14, at 7 p.m. at Scuppernong Books, 304 S. Elm Street. It is free and open to the public and will be followed by a book signing.

Singleton’s work resonates with that of Donald Barthelme, T. C. Boyle, Flannery O’Connor, and Raymond Carver. “Staff Picks,” his new collection from LSU Press, provides a loosely linked baker’s dozen of stories set in small, often-floundering towns such as Steepleburg, which once boasted more congregations per capita than anywhere in the southeastern U.S., and Poke, home to a dedicated chapter of Optimists International. In turns both comic and tragic, Singleton shows characters trying to make sense out of the Old South, the New South, and the New New South in all their ragged glory.

Singleton has published seven collections of stories, one book of nonfiction, and two novels. His work has appeared in the Atlantic Monthly,Harper’s, Georgia Review, Agni, Southern Review, the Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. He is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers and a former Guggenheim Fellow. He holds the John C. Cobb Endowed Chair in the Humanities at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

 

Fun at Faculty and Staff Alumni Network

Last week, the Alumni Association hosted the kickoff luncheon for the Faculty and Staff Alumni Network. 107 were in attendance, receiving not only a catered lunch but swag bags and t-shirts.

And posing for fun photos, on the day before “Believe in the G.”

Former director of the Alumni Association and two-time alumnus Jeff Colbert, who has taught at UNCG for 32 years, gave welcoming remarks.

The Network will host more events in the future, directed by the interests of those who join. A survey was available during the lunch, but any faculty/staff alumni may contact Dorian Thompson at Drthomp2@uncg.edu to join the Network or to offer suggestions.

 

Video: Chemists on Scooters

In a new series of videos ideal for social media, UNCG Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty and students speak about why and how they chose chemistry, how it matters in the world, and what element they would be – all while traveling campus on scooters. Here’s one by postdoctoral researcher Josh Kellogg.

 

Dr. John R. Locke: A Legacy of Music

This weekend is a celebration of John Locke’s retirement from serving as UNC Greensboro’s Director of Bands.  Be sure to catch him at a special retirement concert Nov. 18, but also view a short video about his career in UNCG’s School of Music.

Looking Ahead: Nov. 14, 2018

Upstairs at GPS: Contemporary Art Discussion Group
Thursday, Nov. 15, 8 p.m.

Southern Conference Volleyball Tournament
Nov. 15 – 18, Fleming Gymnasium

Long Strange Trip: Grateful Dead, Screening #1
Friday, Nov. 16, 6:30 pm., Greensboro Project Space

Storm the Streets, before Men’s Basketball vs. Johnson & Wales
Friday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m., Greensboro Coliseum (Storm the Streets begins 4:45 p.m.)

UNCG Wind Ensemble and Alumni Band (John R. Locke Retirement Concert)
Sunday, Nov. 18, 1:30 p.m., UNCG Auditorium

Choral concert: ‘Harvest Home’
Sunday, Nov. 18, 5 p.m., First Presbyterian Church

Thanksgiving Holiday; offices closed
Thursday, Nov. 23 – Friday November 24

Women’s Basketball vs. UNCP
Sunday, Nov. 25, 2 p.m., Fleming Gymnasium

UNCG Old Time Ensemble Concert
Wednesday, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m., Organ Hall
Chancellor’s Holiday Open House
Thursday, November 29, noon to 3 p.m., Alumni House

 

Bat and medicinal research lecture brings large crowd

Dr. Christine Salomon talks with students

On Friday, White Nose Syndrome researcher Dr. Christine Salomon gave a lecture to a packed auditorium in the Sullivan Science building for the Syngenta Science Symposium, a collaboration between the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Biology.

Co-director of the Medicinal Chemistry Collaborative Nicholas Oberlies invited Salomon to introduce herself and her history, as a researcher, as is customary for visiting scientists at UNCG.

She shared her experience as an undergraduate discovering compounds, her previous work in marine biology and how she came to work for the Center for Drug Design and began her research of the cave-dwelling bats of northern Minnesota. She also shared the realities of White Nose Syndrome, such as that it has wiped out 90 percent of bats at hibernation sites in New York State during a period of only six years, and that it is is rapidly spreading across the country.

Matina Kalcounis-Rüppell and Christine Salomon

Salomon then delved into the specifics of her work in biocontrol possibilities for controlling the devastating disease affecting bat populations. As a last area of discussion, Salomon spent a few minutes talking about the importance of communication in science and how to reach the public. Students, faculty and other attendees were invited to ask questions after the lecture and at the reception that followed.

Text and photos by Susan Kirby-Smith

Renowned bat researcher will speak at UNCG

A little brown bat photographed by Dr. Christine Salomon in the Soudan Mine in northeast Minnesota. Salomon will speak on UNCG’s campus Nov. 2.

It’s the season for bats and, at UNCG, learning how to protect them from a devastating disease.

On Friday, Nov. 2, world-renowned scientist Dr. Christine Salomon will come to UNCG to give the lecture, “Tales from the underground: Searching for biocontrol treatments for white nose syndrome in bats.”

At the Center for Drug Design at the University of Minnesota, Salomon is investigating natural products from bacteria and fungi that may help control the spread of White Nose Syndrome without harming bats or the places they inhabit. For several years, she has collected samples from bats and their roosts in the Soudan Mine in northeast Minnesota, and her lab is looking toward testing biocontrol agents on cave interiors.

Salomon’s visit is the result of collaboration between the Department of Biology and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and part of the Syngenta Science Symposium, which was established nearly two decades ago as a forum to engage UNCG faculty and students as well as scientists and the public in the region.

“This work is tremendously interesting to researchers in biology and in chemistry and biochemistry,” says Dr. Nicholas Oberlies, co-director of the UNCG Medicinal Chemistry Collaborative, whose researchers study natural products to identify compounds of medicinal value. “She’s an outstanding fit for our symposium.”

“The timing is perfect to raise awareness about bats and their importance in ecosystem health and wellness, and the promise of biocontrol through natural products of diseases that impact both wildlife and humans,” adds Dr. Matina Kalcounis-Rüppell, director of the UNCG Bat and Mouse Lab, which examines bat populations across North Carolina.

Salomon says she is looking forward to connecting with researchers at UNCG and other academic institutions, federal and state agencies, and non-profit organizations who have been working on various aspects of White Nose Syndrome, bat biology, epidemiology, ecology and conservation.

The Nov. 2 lecture, at 1 p.m. is free and open to the public and will be in the Sullivan Science Building, Room 101.

The public is also invited to a reception immediately following the talk, in the Sullivan first floor lobby, where they can speak with Dr. Salomon and interact with faculty and graduate students from the Department of Biology and the Department Chemistry and Biochemistry to learn more about bats and natural products.

The UNCG Bat and Mouse Lab will also present two events as part of Bat Week, a worldwide effort to promote bat conservation awareness. Those events will be Oct. 28 at 10 a.m. at the Greensboro Science Center and Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m. at the Kathleen Clay Edwards Family Branch Library.

By Susan Kirby-Smith
Photography courtesy of Christine Salomon

UNCG Herpetology Research Experience leaves lasting legacy

Herp campers take a look at the tiny turtle they found near Chesnut Ridge.

It may be a special person who decides to pick up a snake or a frog, but encounters with these small creatures can influence how we take care of natural environments in our own backyards, and at a global level.

Every summer since 2007, UNC Greensboro biologists and science educators have been bringing high school students into nature, where they encounter a variety of species, perform authentic ecological fieldwork and become active citizen-scientists contributing to real-world data collections. The programs are called Herpetological Research Experiences (HREs) and are commonly known as “herp camps.”

“It’s exciting for students to get up close and personal with wildlife,” says Ann Somers, a faculty member in the Dept. of Biology and a leader in the UNCG Herp Project. “They get to look animals in the eye. They also learn to safely catch and release these animals unharmed.”

Two female professors in outdoor gear.

UNCG Herp Project leaders UNCG professor emeritus Dr. Catherine Matthews and UNCG biology professor Ann Somers

In June, Somers and UNCG professor emeritus Dr. Catherine Matthews advised a creature-capturing program at Chestnut Ridge in nearby Efland, with 9th through 12th-graders, not only from North Carolina, but from as far as Ohio and Florida.

But their contribution to biological camps extends far beyond that. The material they and other members of the Herp Project have created and assembled – activities, curriculum, recommended texts, techniques and guidelines – are available online for all citizen-scientists and those who would like to conduct an HRE.

Somers and Matthews lend their support to at least six camps across North Carolina who use their materials, including programs at the Eno River, the North Carolina Botanical Gardens and the Greensboro Science Center.

students examine live animals

Campers examine wildlife and record measurements they will put into a database used by biology researchers and citizen-scientists.

In all the camps, students locate many species of reptiles and amphibians, identify them, take measurements and submit the data to a Herp Project app that feeds the information to a database used by other citizen-scientists, as well as professional herpetology researchers. Their research becomes part of The Box Turtle Connection, a statewide program that involves 32 research stations across North Carolina. The students also begin to see and understand the herps in their own backyard, and they pass that knowledge on to their friends and families.

Many of the campers return year after year, and some become Spartans and HRE project leaders, partly due to those positive experiences with hands-on research. Herpetology Project participants have also gone on to do further research at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, the Smithsonian National Institute in Washington, D.C., the Bioko Biodiversity Program in Equatorial Guinea and stations as far as Indonesia and Australia.

Campers traverse a wetland

Campers explore a wetland area near Chesnut Ridge

 

“It’s something that has a purpose. You get to work with animals and it’s a lot of fun,” says Nathan Kellam, who has attended the Science Center herpetology camp for all four years and this fall will be a first-year student in the School of Education.

Somers and Matthews are thrilled that their legacy has continued, through the HREs, educators in North Carolina and beyond, campers past and present and the knowledge they will carry with them throughout their lives.

A frog in a hand.

“The magnificent thing about reptiles and amphibians is that you can handle them safely,” explains Somers. “It’s a way for people to establish an affinity with the natural world, and to develop a rapport with animals. That helps us make good decisions that impact the livability of the planet.”

To learn more about the Herp Project at UNC Greensboro, click here.

 

By Susan Kirby-Smith
Photography by Martin W. Kane

Greensboro Bound: UNCG faculty and alumni highlights

Greensboro Bound: A Literary Festival is this coming weekend, and many UNC Greensboro faculty and alumni are participating alongside community members and visiting writers. Check out UNCG participants in the event listings below. View the Greensboro Bound website for the complete schedule.

 

Thursday, May 17

Introduction by Fred Chappell (Creative Writing) with a reading by Brett Ingram ’95

6 p.m. reception; 6:45 p.m. opening remarks, Weatherspoon Art Museum

 

Friday, May 19

Lorena Guillén (Music) and Alejandro Rutty (Music) with the Difficulties with Mark Engebretson (Music)

8:30 p.m., Friday, May 18, Scuppernong Books

 

Saturday, May 18

A Conversation with Lee Smith and Michael Parker (Creative Writing)

10 a.m., Greensboro Cultural Arts Center, Van Dyke Performance Space

 

Unicorn Press Panel including Mark Smith-Soto (Languages, Literatures and Cultures)

10 a.m., Greensboro Central Library, Nussbaum Room

 

Bull City Press Panel including Emilia Phillips (Creative Writing)

11:15 a.m., Greensboro Central Library, Nussbaum Room

 

Greensboro Opera: 15-minute opera for middle schoolers, directed by David Holley (Music) with music by Mark Engebretson (Music)

1 p.m., Greensboro Cultural Arts Center, Van Dyke Performance Space

 

Jabberbox Puppets with Marianne Ginger ’74 MFA and Deborah Seabrook ’75 MFA

2 p.m., Greensboro Cultural Arts Center: Hyers Theater

*For mature audiences

 

Contemporary Muslim Writing Beyond Politics: A Conversation including Dr. Omar H. Ali (Honors College, African American & African Diaspora Studies)

3:15, Cultural Arts Center, Hyers Theater

 

“On Grief and Love,” a Conversation about “The Bright Hour,” by Nina Riggs 04’ MFA, introduced by Provost Dana Dunn

4:30 p.m., Greensboro Cultural Arts Center, Van Dyke Performance Space

 

Short Story Panel including Steve Cushman ’02 MFA

4:30 p.m., Greensboro History Museum, Mary Norris Preyer Hall

 

The Music of John Prine and the Blues, with Dr. Emily Edwards (Media Studies)

9:30 p.m. Greensboro Project Space

 

Sunday, May 20

Novel Panel moderated by Holly Goddard-Jones (Creative Writing) including Jim Minick ’15 MFA

2:15 p.m., Greensboro Central Library, Nussbaum Room

 

UNCG M.F.A. Panel moderated by Terry Kennedy ’99 MFA (Creative Writing) with Heidi Czerwiec’95 MFA, Kerry French ’06 MFA, Sarah Rose Nordgren ’07 MFA

2:15 p.m., Triad Stage Upstage Cabaret

 

Feminist Panel moderated by Dr. Jennifer Feather (English)

2:15, Greensboro Cultural Arts Center, Van Dyke Performance Space

 

Poetry Panel including Lauren Moseley ’08 MFA

3:30 p.m., Triad Stage Upstage Cabaret